YouTube Viewers Are Using it to Learn How to Do Things

Based on Pew Research Center studies

YouTube is primarily entertainment for children, but outside of that people are using it to do things. (Reference chart above).

And this is their pattern of watching…

Education clearly isn’t the only reason to use YouTube, a lot of users are on YouTube to just pass the time. Mostly children and younger adults.  Some other percent of people are there to learn about new products or purchases, while another 1/5 of viewers on YouTube are using the platform to help them understand what’s going on in the world.

From putting on a tie, to learning how to fix a car. People are looking up tutorials on how to do things, which makes me feel a lot better about humanity. Maybe not everyone is playing fortnite and watching cat videos.

 

Donna Stumphf From North Dakota Donates 3,100 Pounds of Vegetables to Give to Families in Need

Donna Stumphf, of Grand Forks, has donated more than 3,100 pounds of vegetables from her garden plot, which was donated to her by All Seasons Garden Center.  for people in need this Fall.

Over the course of six to eight weeks, the 67-year-old from  Grand Forks, North Dakota provided the produce to Northlands Rescue Mission and the Salvation Army.

She kept a record of the amount of donated produce, including beans, kale, Swiss chard, tomatoes, squash, peppers and cucumbers.

It added up faster than she thought, with the original goal being 1,000 pounds.

What an amazing soul and heart, and it’s amazing to see people so giving.

Michigan Voters Approved to Legalize Recreational Marijuana

Michigan voters approved a ballot proposal to legalize recreational marijuana in the state on Tuesday. 

The measure passed by a 55-44 percent margin. Michigan is now the 10th state to legalize marijuana for adults 21 and older.

10 years after Michigan voters approved medical marijuana, it also became the first state in the midwest to legalize marijuana.

Colorado Voters Remove State Language Allowing Prisoners to be Forced into Slave Labor

This is what that language looks like in the 13th Amendment of the US Constitution:

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction

And the same writing in Colorado’s state constitution before voters backed Amendment A:

There shall never be in this state either slavery or involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.

More than 150 years after the ratification of the US Constitution’s 13th Amendment, Colorado has officially abolished slavery.

Citizens of Colorado voted Tuesday for Amendment A, a measure removing language in the state constitution that allowed prison labor without pay.

Colorado is one of more than a dozen states whose state constitution technically still allows involuntary servitude or forced labor as a form of criminal punishment.

The state’s language closely resembles a contested passage that is in the 13th Amendment of the US Constitution, which outlawed indentured servitude and the African slave trade, but allowed those convicted of crimes to be forced into labor.